Engineering Inside:

2013 Issue 1
Space

Blast off with IEEE E-Scientia!

June 2013
E-Scientia module

E-Scientia module

Get ready to boldly take on the role of an engineer in space at a museum near you! IEEE has developed a unique hands-on museum exhibit that invites students to test their engineering skills on an incredible simulated space flight. IEEE E-Scientia was developed by IEEE volunteers in Uruguay to help students learn about what engineers do, and the engineering career possibilities available in the exciting world of aerospace.

During a visit to IEEE E-Scientia, students enter a large structure designed to look like a spacecraft. Inside are five stations equipped with computational, electric circuit hardware, and audio visual equipment. Students use this equipment to solve technical challenges posed during a simulated space flight.

Groups of ten students at a time participate as “crew members” on the flight mission. Once seated at their control posts, they are immersed in video and audio of the launching of an actual Apollo mission.

E-Scientia hands-on activity

E-Scientia hands-on activity

Once the shuttle “reaches space,” Commander Tesla reveals the purpose of their mission. They will need to use their problem solving skills to build electronic devices to provide power, propulsion, communications, life maintenance and defense for the spacecraft.

Students then undergo real-time training on electrical and electronic principles and learn how to assemble the circuits. Students work in pairs to build these devices using educational electronic kits.

The crew team that completes their circuit in the shortest time is awarded a prize. The students then students view a video of the spacecraft’s return to Earth. Upon landing they are told a recovery team is on its way.

While they wait to be rescued, they learn how IEEE supports engineers in making positive contributions to our world and beyond.  At the end of the mission, each participant receives a diploma as a “Junior Engineer.”

IEEE E-Scientia can currently be found at the Espacio Ciencia in Montevideo, Uruguay, and the B.M. Birla Science Center in Hyderabad, India. The exhibit is launching soon at the Universum Museum in Mexico City, Mexico; at Sci-Enza: Hands on Science! in Pretoria, South Africa; and at the Shanghai International Science Exchange Center in Shanghai, China. Several additional locations will be announced soon.

To learn more about what IEEE is doing in the exciting aerospace field, visit the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society (AESS) website (http://ieee-aess.org/).

If IEEE E-Scientia isn’t available at a location near you, try visiting your local planetarium or science center. You’ll find lots of great examples of the out-of-this -world discoveries made possible by engineering.

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Blast off with IEEE E-Scientia!

Get ready to boldly take on the role of an engineer in space at a museum near you! IEEE has developed a unique hands-on museum exhibit that invites students to test their engineering skills on an incredible simulated space flight.

Read more

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